Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Hiking & Mountaineering Boots

Vishnu Kumar from Thinking Particle suggested that I may like to do a post on different trekking shoes and boots and how they should be used. So here is the post!

Trekking Shoes Low Cut
If you are planning to walk on a well defined trail without  a lot of streams to cross, rivers to ford and not much likelihood of snow and rain then this is a good choice. Most of the major companies like Keen, Merrell, Lowa, Vasque make these shoes - some of them are waterproof with Goretex liners, others have proprietary liners made by  the individual companies. Many of them come with Vibram soles as well.

Trekking Boots Mid Cut 
These boots are usually mid cut at the ankle and the upper is usually a fabric-leather combination with a waterproof liner. Many of them have Vibram soles as well. The weight would be less than 3 lb a pair and typically would need minimum break in. They would be suitable for spring and autumn hikes on regular trails. The Merrell Chameleon featured here is typical of a boot of this type.


Trekking Boots  - Heavy Duty and Off Trail
These boots are typically made with all leather waterproof uppers with Goretex liners. There are some models which use a fabric-leather combination as well. They would have a higher cut at the ankle and some of them would support step in crampons.  The weight is around 3-3.5 Lb for a pair and they would require break in. For winter hikes, or off trail/rough trails with heavy loads these boots would be recommended.



Mountaineering Boots
These boots would be typically all leather with a stiff shank. They would have rigid soles and would be waterproof and would be crampon ready - weight would be around 3.5 to 4lb or more and would require break in. The La Sportiva Makalu featured here is a typical boot of this type. These boots would be worn for extended glacier and Himalayan travel.






Plastic Boots
For climbing in snow and wet conditions these plastic boots are recommended. Used extensively in the high Himalaya they are part of every high altitude mountaineer's kit. They are heavy and can fit mountaineering crampons.They also have an insulated liner for maximum warmth. Some of them like the La Sportiva Batura have a gaiter attached to the boot. These boots are expensive in the range of US $ 400 to 800 and are meant for major expedition use. Some of the best mountaineering boots are listed here -
http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Mountaineering-Boot-Reviews




Resources
Top 10 Hiking Boots
http://outdoors.campmor.com/top-10-hiking-boots/#fbid=ldAanYHrkh2
How To Choose Hiking Boots
http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/hiking-boots.html
Common Hiking Boot Lacing Techniques 
http://www.backpacker.com/gear/5245
How to maintain Hiking Boots?
http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/caring-hiking-boots.html
Boot Fitting Guide
http://www.greatoutdoors.com/published/boot-fitting-guide

Note: All photographs are copyright of their respective owners 

7 comments:

  1. Nice post , i hope everyone will like your post

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  2. Excellent blog!! our main goal is to enable them to be a more active and pain-free life

    ReplyDelete
  3. The hiking series by different brands always come with the toughest boots. Lat year, i planned a hiking trip with my friend and was looking for perfect hiking boots and found, that North Face Havoc boots are just awesome for this. The best thing is that they can be roughed out in the most challenging situations, and can guarantee you a safe experience. I do recommend you to have these hiking boots. Thanks!!!

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  4. Awesome work! That is quite appreciated. I hope you’ll get more success. visit this page

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  5. Your collection is good. Did you know that the Makalalu boots are linemen's top choice http://mybootprint.com/best-lineman-boots/. They are quite durable and reliable!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Best hiking boots for everyone. I really like your article post. 2nd boat is really awesome and best performance.

    ReplyDelete

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